Tag Archives: what back end means

Website Development

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1. What is Website is

Websites are files stored on servers, which are computers that host (fancy term for “store files for”) websites. These servers are connected to a giant network called the internet or the World Wide Web (if we’re sticking with 90s terminology). We talk more about servers in the next section. Browsers are computer programs that load the websites via your internet connection, such as Google Chrome or Internet Explorer. Your computer is also known as the client.

2.What HTTP means

HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP) connects you and your website request to the remote server that houses all website data. It’s a set of rules (a protocol) that defines how messages should be sent over the internet. It allows you to jump between site pages and websites. When you type a website into your web browser or search for something through a search engine, HTTP provides a framework so that the client (computer) and server can speak the same language when they make requests and responses to each other over the internet. It is essentially the translator between you and the internet. It reads your website request and translates it for you in the form of a website.

3. What Front-end Means

Front-end  is the side of a website or software that you see and interact with as an internet user. When website information is transferred from a server to a browser, front-end coding languages allow the website to function without having to continually “communicate” with the internet. Front-end code allows users like you and me to interact with a website and play videos, expand or minimize images, highlight text, and more. Web developers who work on front-end coding work on client-side development.

4. What Bark-end Means

Back-end is the side that you don’t see when you use the internet. It’s the digital infrastructure, and to non-developers, it looks like a bunch of numbers, letters, and symbols. There are more back-end coding languages than front-end languages. That’s because browsers — at the front-end — only understand JavaScript, but a server — at the back-end — can be configured to understand pretty much any language. We’ll cover more about back-end development next.