Wear the shoes of a supervisor for a few moments and ask yourself which person you would recommend for a raise or a promotion:

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  1. The secretary who, when the executive is out of the office, spends her time reading magazines or the secretary who uses such time to do the many little things that help the executive to accomplish more when he returns?
  2. The employee who says, “Oh well, I can always get another job. If they don’t like the way I do my work, I’ll just quit” or the employee who views criticism constructively and sincerely tries to do higher-quality work?
  3. The salesman who tells a customer, “Oh, I just do what they tell me to do . They said come out and see if you need anything” or the salesman who says, “Mr. Brown, I’m here to help you?
  4. The foreman who says to an employee, “To tell you the truth, I don’t like my job much. Those guys up top give me a pain in the neck. I don’t know what they’re talking about half the time” or the supervisor who says, “You’ve got to expect some unpleasantness on any job. But let me assure you, the men in the front office are on the ball. They’ll do right by us”?

Remember, It Pays In Every Way To Think Big!

Think Big
  1. Don’t sell yourself short. Conquer the crime of self-deprecation. Concentrate on your assets. You’re better than you think you are.
  2. Use the big thinker’s vocabulary. Use big, bright, cheerful words. Use words that promise victory, hope, happiness, pleasure; avoid words that create unpleasant images of failure, defeat, grief.
  3. Stretch your vision. See what can be, not just what is. Practice adding value to things, to people, and to yourself.
  4. Get the big view of your job. Think, really think your present job is important. That next promotion depends mostly on how you think toward your present job.
  5. Think above trivial things. Focus your attention on big objectives. Before getting involved in a petty matter, ask yourself, “Is it really important?”Grow big by thinking big!