5 Great Business Ideas by [idopedia]

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1. App developer

If you are knowledgeable and experienced in technology, you may want to consider a career in app development. Smartphones have become an everyday accessory for many Americans, which has increased demand for mobile apps. Similarly, virtual reality software has become popular in recent years, so there is also a demand for VR app development.

2. Professional organizer 

Looking for a business idea that can really “spark joy”? Professional organizers, like Marie Kondo, help people declutter and minimize for a living. In an age of materialism, many people are desperate to downsize and take control over their possessions, rather than letting their things possess them. Minimalism is becoming extremely popular, but people often find it hard to part with things they’ve owned for a long time. Part of being a professional organizer is helping clients develop a system for downsizing and keeping things that way.

If you’re a highly organized person who enjoys making spaces functional and comfortable, you might be good at coaching others to do the same. People will pay you to help them devise a method of minimizing their possessions and then maintaining an organized space. To promote your business, ask if your clients will let you take before and after photos of the areas of their homes you’ve organized, and use those to create a portfolio that you can put on social media to attract more clients.

3. Lawn care service

If you grew up with a lawn, chances are your parents made you take care of it. For many of us, lawn care is bothersome, but for some, it offers a sense of peace and serenity. Working outdoors with your hands to tame and beautify the natural landscape can be a rewarding experience, and since so many people find the work tedious, it can also be profitable.

Lawn care services require little more than some basic equipment, a trailer and perhaps some staff, depending on how many clients you have and how big the jobs are. You can quickly grow a small lawn care service into a full landscaping company by offering premium services and establishing a reputation as a brand that does a thorough job with a smile. If you like working outdoors and creating elegant landscapes, this could be the business for you.

4. Rideshare driver

If starting your own business seems daunting or too much of a risk, you can always use your car to become a ride share driver. The overhead and responsibility of running the company falls on the ride share service, giving you the freedom to work as much or as little as you need. Ride share applications such as Uber and Lyft have enabled people to start side hustles that pay well and require little more than a willingness to drive people to their destinations and make occasional friendly conversation.

Ride share drivers have the independence of a small business owner without the heavy workload required to manage the logistics behind the scenes. If any of the other business ideas seem like they require too much effort or upfront capital, ride sharing might be a great way for you to dip your toes into the world of entrepreneurship.

5. Dropshipping

Not all companies that sell goods store them onsite. In drop shipping, people who run e-commerce sites go to a third party to fulfill all orders. The third party is likely a wholesale retailer or other entity that runs a warehouse and shipping operation. The minimal inventory and tools needed for drop shipping make it an especially great startup idea if you’re worried about overhead and physical space.

What is Business Management? by [idopedia]

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BUSINESS MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW

As a business manager, you are given the major responsibility of managing administrative tasks for a business. A company may expect you to assist with its marketing program. A company may also want you to perform a budget analysis in order to find out ways that the company can cut costs. You should have an astute understanding of accounting, marketing and administrative procedures that are required in order to run a business.

The competition for business management positions can be fierce. You should obtain a degree in business administration, accounting or marketing if you eventually want to obtain a business management position.

Salary

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the average salary of a business manager is about $77,000 a year. The position is expected to grow by at least 15 per cent in the next ten years. Businesses will be facing increased demands as they try to adjust to online commerce. If you have specialized knowledge of online sales, then you may find that you are easily able to find a position as a business manager. Companies will also be seeking individuals who have an accounting background and are able to cut down on the costs that a company faces.

Education Requirements

To become a business manager, it is essential to possess a four-year bachelor’s degree in administration, accounting, finance or marketing. If you have a special certification, such as a CPA license, then this can also be beneficial if you apply for a position as a business manager. Companies are now hiring individuals who can also assist with financial operations. You may need to do compliance work for a company to ensure that the company is adhering to the recently passed financial regulations. Companies are also looking for individuals who now possess a master’s degree in business or accounting. You should expect to obtain an MBA in management or accounting at some point in your career.

Skills Required

To excel as a business manager, it is essential that you have strong analytical abilities. You will need to foresee the demands that a company will face in the future. It is also important that you have the ability to work well with other people. You should be able to work with a variety of personalities. Employees will look to you for leadership and motivation. You should be able to inspire employees to excel in their work during high-pressure times for the business. You also may need to possess strong accounting skills if a business expects you to perform a budget analysis of its operations every month.

Responsibilities

Typically, the responsibilities of business managers involve overseeing operations, reviewing contracts and helping employees reach their top productivity levels. A business manager may also be called upon to supervise or train new employees. He or she may also need to assist with planning certain events for a company. A business manager plays an important role in the operation of a company, and it is essential that he or she can deal with heavy loads of stress.

What is Business & Management? by [idopedia]

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Business and Management are the disciplines devoted to organizing, analyzing, and planning various types of business operations. And if that sounds really general, that’s just because these fields cover a lot of ground!

These degree programs teach the fundamental skills that are required to efficiently run or manage a business. That’s why you’ll find Business and Management majors in every industry, in a variety of different types of jobs.

So, whether you want to work for a large corporation, or in a mom-and-pop shop, you can be confident that a degree in Business and Management will teach you the skills and theory you need for a successful career.

Fields of Study in Business & Management

The possible job titles for Business and Management majors are practically unlimited. They range from financial managers, who use their mathematical skills to generate financial forecasts, to marketing managers, who draw upon their creativity to manage advertising and sales efforts.

If you are interested in pursuing a degree in Business and Management, there are dozens of potential fields of study to choose from, including:

  • Advertising
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Hospitality Management
  • Information Systems Management
  • International Business
  • Nonprofit Management
  • Operations Management
  • Public Administration
  • Sales Management
  • Supply Chain Management

And if you’re looking for more of a non-specialized foundation in the principles of Business and Management, there are also general business degrees that don’t require you to choose a concentration.

Benefits of Business & Management Degrees

A degree in Business and Management will prepare you for a variety of different possible career paths – and with a degree in this field, you’ll always be in demand.

That’s because the skills you’ll gain in a Business and Management program are extremely transferrable, which means that they will be useful in many different industries. That gives you an amazing amount of flexibility if you decide that you want to shift to a different industry or role.

You’ll also have great earning potential with these degrees, especially if you complete a graduate program at a top school. Working in finance or as a chief executive, you could even end up taking home a six-figure salary with your Business and Management degree!

Future of Business & Management

Like many other fields, Business and Management is feeling the impact of technological advances. With big data and artificial intelligence allowing many tasks to be automated, the nature of business is changing every day.

But while most Business and Management specializations are not going to experience dramatic growth in the next decade, the outlook is generally positive according to projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In fact, most job titles in business-related fields are expected to experience steadily increasing demand, keeping pace with the average rate of growth for all jobs.

5 reasons to study a Business management degree course by [idopedia]

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Business Management degree courses are some of the most common in higher education. They have been long established as great courses for entrepreneurs and aspiring business leaders alike.

But why should you study a Business Management degree course? Here are seven reasons why we think you should take a look at what we offer at Birmingham City University.

1.Always in demand

Let’s start with what everyone is really here for – getting a job once you graduate. And while no course can guarantee you a job at the end of it, Business Management graduates can leave university knowing that as long as there are businesses, there will be a need for managers.

Management roles are present in every sector of commerce on the planet, from small local businesses to large international corporations. You will graduate with the fundamentals needed to seek out these roles, no matter where your future business interests lie.

2.Meet people

The university experience isn’t just about what you study though – it’s also about who you study with.

As such a diverse degree, business management courses attract students from all walks of life. They may have grown up around a family run business, or could be completely new to the subject. They will all bring different life experiences with them though, and that can be of great benefit to everyone on the course. You could get the chance to meet people who share your ideas, so much so that you may one day become business partners. Conversely, you could meet students who introduce you to a whole new area of business, one that hits home with you and inspires you to alter your career plans.

3.Transferable skills

As stated above, the skills you learn on your Business Management degree can be applied to practically any kind of business. The experience you pick up during your course can be utilised on any scale, from managing a small team for a retail business, to running an entire corporation.

So if you’re passionate about eco-friendly manufacturing, your degree will be useful. If your passion lies in the motor racing industry, you can apply your skills to job roles there too. Even if you find yourself moving out of the realm of management and onto a different career path, such as in the legal sector, your experiences can still be applied to your new job.

4.Accreditation

What sets one business management course out from another? Accreditations.

These accreditations allow people looking at your CV to know that you came from a quality programme. You can get accredited after you graduate with the various accrediting bodies, but that usually involves paying more and sitting more exams.

Our Business Management degree is accredited by the Chartered Management Institute, and allows you to graduate with a professional qualification from the CMI if you meet certain conditions. Our Human Resource Management course is also accredited by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

So get a leg up on the competition straight away by seeking out accredited courses!

5.ndustry insight

University also allows you access to some of the biggest companies in the country. The Birmingham City Business School organises several trips to business across several different industries, including Manchester United Football Club, and the Bicester Retail Village. But you’ll also get insight into big brands from inside the classroom too. There is a big drive for universities to hire academics straight from industry, so they can pass on their up-to-date, industry relevant experience to students. Some of our staff have worked at places such as Marks & spencer, Nestle, Jaguar Land Rover and Selfridges. They can let you know what life is really like working for these huge international corporations, offering invaluable insight into the real world of management.

What can you do with a bachelor’s in Business Management? by [idopedia]

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Since job opportunity and salaries tend to be higher with a bachelor’s degree, this option is a great choice if you can invest the time in the education upfront. Learn more about the five most common jobs for professionals with this credential.

1. Marketing manager

Marketing managers estimate the demand for products and services that an organization, and its competitors, offer. They identify potential markets for the organization’s products and oversee a team that develops strategies to maximize profits.

2. Sales manager

Sales managers are the professionals responsible for setting the strategy behind sales initiatives and goals. They resolve customer complaints, prepare budgets, monitor customer preferences to determine the focus of sales efforts and analyze sales statistics.

Most sales managers direct the distribution of goods and services by assigning sales territories, setting sales goals and establishing training programs for the organization’s sales representatives. This may also involve recruiting and hiring new sales staff and evaluating their performances.

3. Business analyst

Business analysts spend their work days gathering data concerning problems or procedures within a company. They then analyze the collected information to conclude possible solutions or alterations. New procedures are designed based on interviews conducted with employees, on-site observation and close study of company documents.

4. Financial analyst

Financial analysts conduct qualitative analyses concerning a company’s finances and investments. They compose charts, graphs and spreadsheets; forecasting business, industry and economic conditions through analysis of financial information. They also determine the prices at which a company should offer its product to the public market and prepare investment plans that capitalize on their financial analysis.

5. Account manager

Account managers act as organization’s personal representative to a client. They foster client relationships, work with sales and marketing teams to find new clients, prepare presentations and sales pitches and communicate client agendas to the rest of the company. Depending on their employers, these professionals may work with individual customers or clients who represent entire businesses. Monitoring budgets and explaining cost factors to clients are also part of this role.

What can you do with an associates degree in Business Management by [idopedia]

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The data helped us identify five common jobs seeking professionals with this credential.

1. Bookkeeping, accounting and auditing clerks

Workers in these realms focus on monitoring and maintaining a company’s financial records. Duties typically include coding documents according to procedure, recording and summarizing numerical data on behalf of the company and reconciling any financial discrepancies found all while complying with federal, state and company policies.

2. Administrative assistant

Administrative assistants typically answer phone calls, schedule meetings, update database information, prepare invoices and manage incoming and outgoing mail. These employees must be organized and detail-oriented, as they are responsible for a variety of clerical tasks that keep businesses running smoothly.

3. Sales associate

These workers can be found in a wide range of industries—if there’s a product or service, businesses need someone to help sell it. They offer expertise on merchandise, answer customer questions and process transactions. Many of these positions have the potential to earn commission, which can give you a nice boost to your earning potential if you find the right situation and pay structure.

4. Customer service associate

It’s right there in the title—customer service associates are all about serving the customer. Whether it’s listening to a customer’s questions or concerns, placing orders, providing information about products and services or recording details of customer contact information, these business professionals make sure customers and clients are seen to. Patience and understanding go far in this position, because customer service associates are often listening to customer complaints and working to solve then.

5. Personal banker

A personal banker handles a client’s entire relationship with a retail bank. From loans and personal accounts to trust funds and investments, these bankers have a wide range of knowledge about the products and services a bank offers. They can provide great customer service by answering clients’ questions and helping them make the right decision for their finances. They are the central point of contact for clients.

What is a Business Management degree? by [idopedia]

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Before exploring the many Business Management degree jobs out there, it is helpful to familiarize yourself with the educational elements that help equip students for such positions. The curriculum in a Business Management program covers the fundamental business acumen needed to succeed in this dynamic industry.

Regardless of the degree level, Business Management majors can expect to learn more about business principles, organizational effectiveness, data analytics, relationship management and more. Let’s take a closer look at the types of courses you can expect at the associate’s or bachelor’s degree level.

Common Business Management associate’s degree courses:

  • Principles of Finance
  • Business Analysis and Intelligence
  • Human Resource Management
  • Functional and Project Management
  • Customer Service

Common Business Management bachelor’s degree courses:

  • Accounting for Business Managers
  • Business Law and Ethical Behavior
  • Financial Decision Making and Risk Management
  • Dynamic Team Development
  • Organizational Behavior Analysis

Business Management jobs to consider

The courses listed above help equip Business Management majors with a versatile skill set that can be applied to a variety of positions in the field. There are plenty of viable options for both associate’s and bachelor is degree holders. Let’s explore some common Business Management careers.

Small Business Ideas by [idopedia]

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1. Resume Writer

Creating a resume, cover letter, and — when necessary — portfolio for a new job can be tough and time-consuming. That’s why many people hire help. Assist clients with tailored resumes, beautifully edited cover letters, and carefully-crafted portfolios that make it impossible for employers to ignore.

2. Translator

Speak a foreign language? Start translation service. Consider specializing in a specific genre of translation, like medical or financial translation, as you might be able to fill a niche need in your community.

3. Garden Designer

Many people have the willingness to do the dirty work in their backyards, but few have the know-how to complete the first part of this process — designing and planning the backyard space. Draw up the designs for your clients’ outdoor spaces and let them do the actual digging.

4. Travel Planner

The time of the travel agent might be passing, but people are still looking for those with a knack for more nontraditional travel coordination. If you always plan the perfect vacations complete with beautiful hotels, the ideal location, and a bevvy of delicious restaurants lined up for every evening, consider advertising your services as a more modern approach to travel planning.

5. Car-detailing Specialist

The devil is in the details and you can be too. Car-detailing services that travel to the client are convenient for busy people who can’t find the time to run through the car wash. With this business, your clients only have to pay and the service will be done for them before they know it. Just make sure you have the flexibility, transportation, and equipment to take your business on the road.

5 Great Business Ideas by [idopedia]

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1. Professional Organizer

Looking for a business idea that can really “spark joy”? Professional organizers, like Marie Kondo, help people declutter and minimize for a living. In an age of materialism, many people are desperate to downsize and take control over their possessions, rather than letting their things possess them. Minimalism is becoming extremely popular, but people often find it hard to part with things they’ve owned for a long time. Part of being a professional organizer is helping clients develop a system for downsizing and keeping things that way.

If you’re a highly organized person who enjoys making spaces functional and comfortable, you might be good at coaching others to do the same. People will pay you to help them devise a method of minimizing their possessions and then maintaining an organized space. To promote your business, ask if your clients will let you take before and after photos of the areas of their homes you’ve organized, and use those to create a portfolio that you can put on social media to attract more clients.

2. Cleaning service

If you like to clean, you can easily turn it into a business. With a few staff members, a host of cleaning supplies and transportation, you can offer cleaning services to homeowners, apartment complexes and commercial properties. Most cleaning service charge between $25 and $50 per hour. Cleaning services are straightforward businesses that require relatively little overhead; you simply need planning, dedication and marketing to get your business noticed.

If you’re looking to differentiate yourself from other cleaning services, consider adding premium options like floor waxing or exterior power washing for an additional fee. These services could be the deciding factor between your new cleaning service and seasoned companies that maintain too large a client list to provide that level of cleaning.

3. Digital Marketing

The importance of the internet grows with every passing day, making it harder all the time for businesses to cut through the clutter and properly market themselves. Digital marketing services are always in demand, and many small and midsize companies would rather outsource it than establish a costly in-house team. If you’ve got chops in SEO, content marketing, pay-per-click, web development or social media management, you could have a business opportunity that allows you the freedom to work from home.

Digital marketing is an important part of a brand, so it’s critical for you to respond to developments in your clients’ marketing strategies. Social media management entails watching for comments and messages around the clock, not just scheduling posts in a “set-it-and-forget-it” mindset. If you enjoy strategizing and implementing plans meticulously, digital marketing could be the right business for you. You may also consider becoming an affiliate marketer, which is another form of digital marketing.

4. Lawn care Service

If you grew up with a lawn, chances are your parents made you take care of it. For many of us, lawn care is bothersome, but for some, it offers a sense of peace and serenity. Working outdoors with your hands to tame and beautify the natural landscape can be a rewarding experience, and since so many people find the work tedious, it can also be profitable.

Lawn care services require little more than some basic equipment, a trailer and perhaps some staff, depending on how many clients you have and how big the jobs are. You can quickly grow a small lawn care service into a full landscaping company by offering premium services and establishing a reputation as a brand that does a thorough job with a smile. If you like working outdoors and creating elegant landscapes, this could be the business for you.

5. Rideshare Driver

If starting your own business seems daunting or too much of a risk, you can always use your car to become a rideshare driver. The overhead and responsibility of running the company fall on the rideshare service, giving you the freedom to work as much or as little as you need. Rideshare applications such as Uber and Lyft have enabled people to start side hustles that pay well and require little more than a willingness to drive people to their destinations and make occasional friendly conversation.

Rideshare drivers have the independence of a small business owner without the heavy workload required to manage the logistics behind the scenes. If any of the other business ideas seem like they require too much effort or upfront capital, ridesharing might be a great way for you to dip your toes into the world of entrepreneurship.

Home Business Ideas by [idopedia]

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1. Voiceover Artist

Speaking of podcasts and videos, many content creators recognize the value and level of professionalism that great voice talent can bring to a project. There are gigs out there for podcast intros/outros, narration for explainer videos, or even voice work for audio books.

2. Start as a side business or hobby.

Can you get your business off the ground as something you do in the evenings or on the weekends (a.k.a. a side job)? This allows you to make some mistakes, test the market, and understand whether your idea has legs before you quit your nine-to-five job and lose your primary income.

3. Social Media Manager

Do you have a knack for social media? As a social media manager, you can use your skills to manage the social media accounts for companies and even individual people. Influencer marketing has become more common and many influencers rely on marketing agencies or employees to help them run their social channels.

4. Data Entry Clerk

Many businesses seek data entry clerks to help them enter information into their computer systems and spreadsheets. If you have strong computer and typing skills, this might be the business for you.

1. Coding

Frontend, backend, and every type of code in between, this skill requires no in-person interaction with your clients. But one skill you’ll want to carry over from the in-person world for this type of business is active listening. It can be easy to zone out while building a product, but developing a connection with the client is just as important as developing the code for their website.

If you keep the client top of mind when you can’t be around physically, you can ensure that you’re meeting their development needs with your coding work.