Category Archives: Motivation

1$,One Plant Project

We are working with SG Welfare Community in Pakistan.

Our new target is to grow 10000 plants this spring season.

Due to Global warming, the temperature is increasing day by day.

One day it will impossible to live on this beautiful Earth.

The only way to counter this problem is to grow plants effectively.

It will give us pure and fresh oxygen as well as liveable temperature. SG Welfare Community is doing well in the field of education, unemployment and Environmental crisis.

We hope to be supported all around the world in different ways given below:

1. By growing Plants

2. By supporting with a donation

3. By sharing with friends and family

Hope it will bring some positivity in us.

Sincerely!

CEO of SG Welfare Community: Muddasir Hussain

5 Personal Habits of Successful People

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1. Seek new experiences and learning

Expanding our horizons make us happier. And successful people are quite aware of it. As intelligent beings created for good and beauty, we are meant for a constant life of development and enrichment. Living, experiencing, and growing our knowledge about life, the world and all its wonders, work positively on one’s personal development. Research from San Francisco state university  has proven how people who spent money on experiences rather than material items are simply happier. 

This does not just mean traveling the world with a backpack—despite how fashionable it has become. There are many different ways to expand our perspective, depending on our own character and tastes. The only thing to keep in mind is that leaving our comfort zone and acquiring a life long learning approach is the master key to positive accomplishment.

2. Find happiness in the success of others

Successful people do compare themselves with those ones that are better. But they do it from a perspective of admiration and positive emulation. They identify in others skills and talents they lack and they work towards developing these—but not out of competitiveness or jealousy. Successful people are aware of the adverse effects and lack of results derived from enviousness and resentment. They compete exclusively with the best version of themselves. Never with others. They have role models, not rivals. 

3. Empathy

Successful people are incredibly empathetic. They create a world full of friends that help them, admire them, and accompany them. They listen to others and care about others. They know that after all, the road to success is never an isolated one. They are aware they need to rely on others to get where they need to get. Empathy, as the skill allowing us to put ourselves on others shoes and positively connecting with them, is a crucial tool for leadership and ultimate performance.

4. Lifestyle

Successful people do not think in terms of work/life balance. They just think in terms of “life.” They know they have only one, and they have committed to living it to the fullest. They design their own lifestyle. They enjoy what they do. They work very hard, but they are not married to their job. They follow a life-flow they can be proud of.

5. Challenge

Successful people do always have something to prove to themselves. They are driven by challenge. They are challenge-makers. Challenge develops mental toughness, stands down fear,  inspires courageous acts, tests the limits, focuses attention, matures perspective, and builds self-confidence. It’s through challenges that successful people find opportunities. It’s through challenges that successful people set ambitious goals to be achieved. It’s through challenges that successful people grow, develop and flourish.

6 Tips to Boost Confidence/Building self-Esteem/ Build self Confidence

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1. CHALLENGE BAD THOUGHTS ABOUT YOURSELF

Replace them with more positive thoughts which celebrate things you’re good at. You can do this by writing down a list of at least three things you do well.

Remember this list when you start feeling low, this will help bring yourself back to reality.

2. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF

Eating well and exercising boosts endorphins, the body’s natural opiates, which make you feel good on the inside and stimulates a more positive mood.

When you exercise, you’ll ease stress and feel better about yourself. Having a cheesy dance in your bedroom, or going for a jog around the block are great ways to boost your self-esteem.

3. RELAX

The constant feeling of stress can play a huge role in low self-esteem. It makes you feel negative thoughts more often, it reduces your confidence and you’ll probably feel too tired to exercise, be social or do a lot of the things you love.

Reducing your stress by taking time out to do something you find relaxing is a great starting point to making yourself feel be anything from taking as you name it, if it to works for you, it works!

4. SET GOALS

This can be as simple as finishing off a piece of work or tidying up (and we all know how challenging this can be!)

You’ll feel an enormous sense of accomplishment when you’ve ticked off everything on your list for the day.

The trick is to not get bogged down by the list; some days you won’t manage to get it all done and that’s OK too! We all have off days, maybe make a shorter list for the next day and see how you get on?

5. HELP SOMEONE OUT

This can be a friend, family member or even a classmate who is struggling with their work or having a tough time at school. You could give them some advice or just be there to listen to a problem.

It’s amazing how much our confidence is boosted when we do selfless things – do one thing a week to help someone else without expecting anything in return.



6 Different Types of Communication

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1.Verbal Communication

Verbal communications in business take place over the phone or in person. The medium of the Message is oral. Let’s return to our printer cartridge example. This time, the Message is being conveyed from the Sender (the Manager) to the Receiver (an employee named Bill) by telephone. We’ve already seen how the Manager’s request to Bill (“We need to buy more printer toner cartridges”) can go awry. Now let’s look at how the same Message can travel successfully from Sender to Receiver.

Manager (speaking on the phone): “Good morning, Bill!”

(By using the employee’s name, the manager is establishing a clear, personal link to the Receiver.)

Manager: “Your division’s numbers are looking great.”

(The Manager’s recognition of Bill’s role in a winning team further personalizes and emotionalizes the conversation.)

Manager: “Our next step is to order more printer toner cartridges. Could you place an order for 1,000 printer toner cartridges with Jones Computer Supplies? Our budget for this purchase is $30,000, and the cartridges need to be here by Wednesday afternoon.” (The Manager breaks down the task into several steps. Each step consists of a specific task, time frame, quantity, or goal.)

Bill: “Sure thing! I’ll call Jones Computer Supplies and order 1,000 more printer toner cartridges, not exceeding a total of $30,000, to be here by Wednesday afternoon.”

2. Storytelling

Storytelling has been shown to be an effective form of verbal communication; it serves an important organizational function by helping to construct common meanings for individuals within the organization. Stories can help clarify key values and help demonstrate how things are done within an organization, and story frequency, strength, and tone are related to higher organizational commitment (McCarthy, 2008). The quality of the stories entrepreneurs tell is related to their ability to secure capital for their firms(Martens, et. al., 2007). Stories can serve to reinforce and perpetuate an organization’s culture, part of the organizing P-O-L-C function.

3.Crucial Conversations

While the process may be the same, high-stakes communications require more planning, reflection, and skill than normal day-to-day interactions at work. Examples of high-stakes communication events include asking for a raise or presenting a business plan to a venture capitalist. In addition to these events, there are also many times in our professional lives when we have cruscia conversations discussions where not only the stakes are high but also where opinions vary and emotions run strong (Patterson, et. al., 2002). One of the most consistent recommendations from communications experts is to work toward using “and” instead of “but” as you communicate under these circumstances. In addition, be aware of your communication style and practice flexibility; it is under stressful situations that communication styles can become the most rigid.

4.Written Communication

In contrast to verbal communications, written business communications are printed messages. Examples of written communications include memos, proposals, e-mails, letters, training manuals, and operating policies. They may be printed on paper, handwritten, or appear on the screen. Normally, a verbal communication takes place in real time. Written communication, by contrast, can be constructed over a longer period of time. Written communication is often asynchronous (occurring at different times). That is, the Sender can write a Message that the Receiver can read at any time, unlike a conversation that is carried on in real time. A written communication can also be read by many people (such as all employees in a department or all customers). It’s a “one-to-many” communication, as opposed to a one-to-one verbal conversation. There are exceptions, of course: a voicemail is an oral Message that is asynchronous. Conference calls and speeches are oral one-to-many communications, and e-mails may have only one recipient or many.

5.Body Language

A simple rule of thumb is that simplicity, directness, and warmth convey sincerity. And sincerity is key to effective communication. A firm handshake, given with a warm, dry hand, is a great way to establish trust. A weak, clammy handshake conveys a lack of trustworthiness. Gnawing one’s lip conveys uncertainty. A direct smile conveys confidence.

6.Eye Contact

In business, the style and duration of eye contact considered appropriate vary greatly across cultures. In the United States, looking someone in the eye (for about a second) is considered a sign of trustworthiness.