Brain Hacks to Boost Your Motivation

You sit down at your computer intending to work on your next project or task, then procrastination sets in. Two hours later, you realize you still have not begun the task in earnest. Why is it so easy to shrug something off, even when you know the job must get done?

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Each type of motivation can be effective. Internal motivation is thought to work best in the long run, but external motivation can be a useful tool in some cases, such as prompting you to complete a task or assignment that doesn’t internally interest you.

The secret is knowing how to tap into both types of motivations to overcome procrastination and be more proactive. To help you do that, here are 5 brain hacks to boost motivation and stay productive, even when distractions abound.

  1. Tap into your bigger purpose.

When you find your motivation is lacking, try focusing on the purpose behind what you are doing or on how it plays into the larger goal of what you want to accomplish. Focusing on the bigger goal gives you the feeling of working on something greater and being part of something bigger than yourself. It gives deeper meaning to the objective you seek or the project you are putting long hours into.

  1. Don’t over thinks it

Overthinkers complicate an easy task by anticipating unlikely problems. When you overthink a project you are working on, it creates more stress and pressure. Ultimately, it obstructs your motivation. To counter a tendency to overthink a problem, make sure to keep your goals simple and small. This will break your objectives into more manageable chunks. Focus on accomplishing each step. This in turn creates motivation, because you see yourself moving forward and accomplishing your goals.

  1. Strengthen Your good memories

Another way to tap into your natural motivation is to strengthen those memories where you are succeeding and accomplishing your goals. By doing this, you can enhance and encourage your motivation and inspiration. To do this, recall as vividly as you can a fulfilling memory of succeeding or accomplishing your goals. Imagine this memory as if it were being projected on a huge IMAX screen. Make the memory bright and loud. Now increase the positive feelings that you experienced, just like turning up a dial.

Do this 5 or 10 times, and you’ll discover that what was once just a positive memory is now a driving motivation. The more you experience the memory, the more you’ll want to relive it and make it real again.